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List: Trolley Problems That Make You, a Millennial Woman of Color, Wish You Had Two Trolleys

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People who ask when you’re planning on getting married OR people who ask when your parents are arranging your marriage

White parents who complain to you that their kids have no chance of getting into top universities because those Asian kids work too hard and score better on all the widely known admission criteria OR people who claim their sexist and/or racist actions do not reflect who they are, which is definitely not sexist and/or racist

The publishers of “20 Under 20” and “30 Under 30” lists OR the people who make it onto those lists

Men’s rights activists OR Congressional Republicans

Chad, a guy at the gym who watched you doing planks before interrupting your circuit to question your form and give you his number OR Elijah, a guy who talked at you for two hours after you hooked up about the fundamental problems with feminism and, the morning after, texted you about why you should become vegan

People who say “boys will be boys” OR people who deem any critique of a woman “shaming”

People who can correctly pronounce the names of every character on Game of Thrones but ask if you have a shorter nickname the first time they meet you OR white people who caption photos of themselves volunteering for a week with brown children “#blessed”

Thought leaders who want to empower you (direct object) but can’t get any more specific about what exactly they will empower you to do (adverb infinitive) OR people who argue an English degree is a waste of time

Strangers who ask where you’re really from OR white friends who say you’re not a “real American” because you have not eaten Kraft Mac ‘n Cheese

Non-technical people who believe machine learning will solve every problem OR tech people who believe machine learning will solve every problem

The mother of your white roommate in sophomore year who, having introduced herself, offered you $200 to do her adult child’s laundry OR people who like to inform you that actually, not everything is about race

The roommate who loudly baby-talks to her cats OR property owners who support restrictive zoning ordinances that exacerbate the housing shortage, thereby forcing grown adults to live with roommates.

People who say #NotAllMen OR people who say #AllLivesMatter

Baby boomers who complain about millennials ruining things OR millennials who talk about disrupting mature business ecosystems by outperforming incumbents through intelligently leveraging innovative ideations to generate paradigm shifts

The white male venture capitalist who told you that he started a newer, smaller, more exclusive series of tech meet-ups because “it’s so annoying to be at events where half the people don’t speak English” OR those people from earlier who are still lecturing you about how, actually, not everything is about race

The marketing genius behind 10-step skincare routines OR companies that rebrand themselves as feminist by changing their advertising rather than their corporate policies and practices

Sexual harassers, rapists, and their enablers who lose their jobs and complain about being convicted without due process OR judges who sentence convicted sexual harassers, rapists, and their enablers to probation rather than jail time

Guys on Tinder who never respond to your messages OR guys on Tinder who message you first with “Anal? ;)”

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notadoctor
9 hours ago
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Oakland, CA
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Google and Uber

jwz
2 Comments and 12 Shares
How are these murderous sociopaths not in jail?

"If it is your job to advance technology, safety cannot be your No. 1 concern," Levandowski told me. "If it is, you'll never do anything. It's always safer to leave the car in the driveway. You'll never learn from a real mistake."

Levandowski had modified the cars' software so that he could take them on otherwise forbidden routes. A Google executive recalls witnessing Taylor and Levandowski shouting at each other. Levandowski told Taylor that the only way to show him why his approach was necessary was to take a ride together. The men, both still furious, jumped into a self-driving Prius and headed off.

The car went onto a freeway, where it travelled past an on-ramp. According to people with knowledge of events that day, the Prius accidentally boxed in another vehicle, a Camry. A human driver could easily have handled the situation by slowing down and letting the Camry merge into traffic, but Google's software wasn't prepared for this scenario. The cars continued speeding down the freeway side by side. The Camry's driver jerked his car onto the right shoulder. Then, apparently trying to avoid a guardrail, he veered to the left; the Camry pinwheeled across the freeway and into the median. Levandowski, who was acting as the safety driver, swerved hard to avoid colliding with the Camry, causing Taylor to injure his spine so severely that he eventually required multiple surgeries.

The Prius regained control and turned a corner on the freeway, leaving the Camry behind. Levandowski and Taylor didn't know how badly damaged the Camry was. They didn't go back to check on the other driver or to see if anyone else had been hurt. Neither they nor other Google executives made inquiries with the authorities. The police were not informed that a self-driving algorithm had contributed to the accident.

Levandowski, rather than being cowed by the incident, later defended it as an invaluable source of data, an opportunity to learn how to avoid similar mistakes. He sent colleagues an e-mail with video of the near-collision. Its subject line was "Prius vs. Camry." (Google refused to show me a copy of the video or to divulge the exact date and location of the incident.) He remained in his leadership role and continued taking cars on non-official routes.

According to former Google executives, in Project Chauffeur's early years there were more than a dozen accidents, at least three of which were serious. One of Google's first test cars, nicknamed kitt, was rear-ended by a pickup truck after it braked suddenly, because it couldn't distinguish between a yellow and a red traffic light. Two of the Google employees who were in the car later sought medical treatment. A former Google executive told me that the driver of the pickup, whose family was in the truck, was unlicensed, and asked the company not to contact insurers. kitt's rear was crushed badly enough that it was permanently taken off the road.

In response to questions about these incidents, Google's self-driving unit disputed that its cars are unsafe. "Safety is our highest priority as we test and develop our technology," a spokesperson wrote to me. [...]

As for the Camry incident, the spokesperson [said that] because Google's self-driving car did not directly hit the Camry, Google did not cause the accident.

These words actually came out of this creature's mouth, on purpose, when it knew that humans could hear it speaking:

"The only thing that matters is the future," [Levandowski] told me after the civil trial was settled. "I don't even know why we study history. It's entertaining, I guess -- the dinosaurs and the Neanderthals and the Industrial Revolution, and stuff like that. But what already happened doesn't really matter. You don't need to know that history to build on what they made. In technology, all that matters is tomorrow."

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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notadoctor
9 hours ago
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Oakland, CA
popular
1 day ago
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mkalus
1 day ago
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W T F.
iPhone: 49.287476,-123.142136
jimwise
2 days ago
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😳

I have to give credit, this is legitimately funny.

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I have to give credit, this is legitimately funny.

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notadoctor
5 days ago
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Oakland, CA
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Monologue: I’m the Tech Venture Capitalist Giving You the Freedom to Barely Scrape By

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My venture capital firm invests in companies that are disrupting established industries, but what hasn’t changed is how much we care about worker well-being. It’s a humbling sacrifice to let you, dear worker, get a leg up in this world through a plethora of side hustles.

That’s why you should become a rideshare driver for our chief investment company! All you’ll need is residence in a popular city with a party scene, a smartphone with a great data plan, a car with four doors, many a tank of gas, car insurance, health insurance, and self-employment tax software.

Don’t worry, we don’t make you get fingerprinted — what a pain in the ass startup cost! — that would be totally uncool and all regulatory of us. We’re cool guys — our firm’s office has ping pong, foosball, and those impractical hanging egg chairs, all for our full-time employees to enjoy. We don’t cop to those old school, bummer “rules" — you know, those ones they created after labor strikes? That’s SO one hundred years ago.

We’re changing work culture to be more flexible for you — you don’t want that 9-to-5 BS or retirement contributions! You’re blazing your own path. You’re an iconoclast. We’ll free you from the hassles of answering to or complaining to HR, and save you from the burden of using 20 paid vacation and sick days. Losers get the flu; you don’t.

No car? No problem! We’ll lease you one at the absolute steal of a 300% markup. That won’t eat into your profit, either. We take it straight from your paycheck, so it’s just an additional operating cost. And we put that moola right back into our worker development program: testing our self-driving cars.

But hey, we get it: rent is expensive. We’ve got your back with a primo tip: skip the lunch break and walk dogs for our amigos at Wag — where we own a ten percent stake — and you’ll make barkin’ bank. Hopscotch across town to pick up Banjo the collie, Panther the doberman, and Lupe, the labradoodle — all free-range dogs unspoiled by basic obedience training. And boom! Now you’ve broken even.

But the gig economy offers so many opportunities for passive income and we don’t want you to miss out! Here’s a lifehack: get ahead by renting out your home six nights a week through our other investi-buddies at AirBnB. All you’ll need is a gorgeous home with a mid-century modern aesthetic (I’ll sell you a discounted egg chair!), Instagrammable natural light, a fantastic location in a trendy district, and impeccable local recs of aspirational ristoranti. You won’t need a place to stay — losers get sleep deprivation; you don’t.

Then you can spend your nights making more Benjamins as an on-call housekeeper or nanny through our domestic workers’ service, Cleanr. You’ll need loads of last-minute availability, internet access, natural cleaning supplies, and a digital media strategist so you don’t make the boo-boo of uploading an icky profile picture. While you’re there, earn some dough for marketing materials by using our newest venture, Task Rabbit, to put together that stranger’s Ikea bed, the Snefjord!

Take your unpaid vacation whenever you want — no one’s the boss of you! Save up by making some extra cha-ching with a side hustle as a shopper for Instacart (no financial claim here — we just bros!) and get rich purchasing other people’s groceries.

So now you’re set driving for Uber, walking dogs between rides, renting out your place, cleaning other people’s houses, and doing their basic life maintenance. But you’ll probs still need some dough for that health insurance. Luckily, I own a stake in a company that’ll set you up as a cam girl. All you’ll need there is a computer and the exciting possibility of being doxxed. Losers get harassed online; you don’t.

It makes me so happy to help. Think of me as a modern Andrew Carnegie or Andrew Mellon. The true philanth-robber-barons of their day. I care deeply about worker well-being, and that’s why it’d be baller if you signed this agreement prohibiting discussion of collective action or pesky unions. You ain’t no union guppie; you’re a shark (in the sense that sharks never stop swimming).

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notadoctor
9 days ago
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Oakland, CA
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acdha
8 days ago
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This is too close
Washington, DC

A Map of the World Where the Sizes of Countries Are Determined by Population

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World Map Population

Max Roser has constructed a cartogram of the world where the size of the countries are determined by their populations (big version of the image here). He refers to it as “the map we need if we want to think about how global living conditions are changing”.

The cartogram is made up of squares, each of which represents half a million people of a country’s population. The 11.5 million Belgians are represented by 23 squares; the 49.5 million Colombians are represented by 99 squares; the 1.415 billion people in China are represented by 2830 squares; and this year’s entire world population of 7.633 billion people is represented by the total sum of 15,266 squares.

As the size of the population rather than the size of the territory is shown in this map you can see some big differences when you compare it to the standard geographical map we’re most familiar with. Small countries with a high population density increase in size in this cartogram relative to the world maps we are used to — look at Bangladesh, Taiwan, or the Netherlands. Large countries with a small population shrink in size — talking about you Canada, Mongolia, Australia, and Russia.

Some observations (Roser has many more if you click through):

1. Look at how teeny Russia is. (So is Canada.)

2. Seriously, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nigeria, Indonesia, and Brazil all have larger populations than Russia. Japan, Ethiopia, and Mexico are very close.

3. 60% of the world’s population lives in Asia.

4. 5 times as many people live in Madagascar as do Ireland. The populations of Ireland + the Scandinavian countries = the population of Peru.

5. Europe is tiny. Guns, Germs, and Steel, yo.

6. India and China. Damn.

I would love to see an animated version of this cartogram from like 1950 to 2100 (like this one of the US).

Tags: maps   Max Roser   population
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notadoctor
35 days ago
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Oakland, CA
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Why Are E-Bikes Legal For Citi Bike Users And Not Immigrant Delivery Workers?: Gothamist

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Chen Qixiong, 56, delivering food on his throttle-controlled e-bike in Midtown this past winter. "For us delivery guys, we don’t make that much money," Chen told Gothamist. "To fine us $500, that’s a whole week’s worth of money gone.”

On Wednesday morning, nearly 50 people hopped on brand new electric Citi Bikes to demonstrate how easy (and fun!) commuting over the Williamsburg Bridge can be, once the L train shuts down in April of next year. An electric moped service recently launched in Brooklyn, and the Daily News reported that two city councilmembers are drafting legislation to legalize the kind of app-based electric scooters that have swept across cities like Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.. Meanwhile, the NYPD continues to confiscate electric bikes used by immigrant delivery cyclists, issuing them summonses that carry $500 fines for using what is essentially the same kind of technology.

New York Administrative Code Section 19-176.2 prohibits the use of "motorized scooters" on City streets; that term is defined as:

any wheeled device that has handlebars that is designed to be stood or sat upon by the operator, is powered by an electric motor or by a gasoline motor that is capable of propelling the device without human power and is not capable of being registered with the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles.

The e-bikes favored by delivery cyclists tend to use a throttle, so they are "capable of propelling the device without human power," and are thus illegal.

The pedal-assisted e-bikes put on city streets by Citi Bike and other bikeshare operators propel the rider forward as they pedal, and have technically always been legal. Last month the City made that clear by adopting a tweak to the law that explicitly legalized them. "[T]hrottle-controlled e-bikes continue to be illegal to operate on City streets under State and city law," read the DOT release. The pedal-assisted Citi Bikes have a maximum acceleration speed of 18 mph, but the maximum speed by law for pedal-assisted bikes is 20 mph.

Throttle-controlled e-bikes have maximum speeds of around 24 mph. (In 2011, the Daily News found some cyclists in Prospect Park traveling at a speed of 31 mph, using only their legs.)

The electric scooter carve-out being prepared by Councilmembers Ydanis Rodriguez and Rafael Espinal Jr. removes the word "stood" from 19-176.2, according to Espinal spokesperson Erika Tannor, and does nothing to address throttle-controlled e-bikes, but she cautioned that the legislation was still being drafted.

"The councilman has no intention of continuing to criminalize e-bikes while legalizing e-scooters, it just absolutely doesn't make sense for his agenda and his record on e-bikes," Tannor said. "Council Member Espinal is in support of e-bikes. We'll look into this further before introducing the bill in September."

Do Lee, a member of the #DeliverJusticeCoalition who wrote his PhD thesis in environmental psychology on delivery cyclists at the CUNY Graduate Center, said the City's actions are a "pattern of making decisions to help those who are already privileged, and excluding those who actually need the help the most."

"Mayor de Blasio and the City have created a Tale of Two E-bikes by bending over backwards to give white collar commuters an e-assist while hyper-policing immigrant delivery workers for their e-bike riding for their jobs," Lee said.

Lee told Gothamist that the DOT had scheduled three meetings with the #DeliverJusticeCoalition to discuss ways to help delivery cyclists convert their throttle-assisted e-bikes to pedal-assist, and cancelled three times, most recently at the end of July.

In a statement, Seth Stein, a spokesperson for Mayor de Blasio, said, “In order to increase the transportation options for New Yorkers, including delivery workers, the Mayor clarified DOT rules that pedal-assist bikes are legal in the City. The Administration is currently considering additional actions to help delivery workers transition their throttle e-bikes to pedal-assist.”

The NYPD has yet to present any evidence to suggest that throttle-controlled e-bikes are more dangerous or harm New Yorkers more than traditional bicycles.

"If we want delivery workers to slow down, then we should improve their working conditions, pay better wages, eliminate wage theft," Lee added. "If we're truly trying to be the fairest big city in the world, as the mayor likes to say, we shouldn't be doing this sort of policymaking."

You can read more on New York City's war on e-bikes here.

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notadoctor
56 days ago
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I am always disappointed to remember that despite many airy promises tech requires a lot of extra effort to actually get deployed equitably and it’s rare for that effort to get put in from the get go
Oakland, CA
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